The Little Theater

When Long Beach Junior College opened its new Carson campus in 1935, its first building was the English Building (the names may have changed a bit over the years, but they’ve never been terribly creative).  The centerpiece of the building was its drama lab, affectionately known as “The Little Theater.”

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The drawing indicates that these stairs are moveable equipment.  The door is one of many on the various stages and should be in the background of the next picture.
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The space behind the gentleman leaning on the railing was later closed off and became P132, my office for the past seven years.  Behind the curtain on the wall was the exterior door that open to the front of P-Building.
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Inside one of the offices that was created in the wings of the old stage you can see that the ceiling beams are the same as in the previous picture.
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Looking towards the stage.

 

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The center doors lead to the hallway.  The door on the right leads to the storage room at the bottom of the building’s tower.  The door on the left has been replaced by the lift to the stage.
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Katharyn Kennedy, the instructor of drama at the time of the building, was especially fond of the many doors that opened to the stage.

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When the room was renovated in 2009, we removed the drop ceiling and exposed the original beams and clerestory windows, but we didn’t think to look at the floor, so we didn’t save the removable floor sections and can’t tell you where they were placed.

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Version 3
Katharyn Kennedy was responsible for the design of the “Little Theater.”  She studied various small theater spaces throughout Southern California and was especially influenced by the Pasadena Playhouse.  When the theater was converted into classroom and office space, she predicted that in time the space would become a theater once again.

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